Advocate

What is an advocate? Advocates speak and act on behalf of others. A children’s advocate who is a believer sees kids from God’s viewpoint and responds in the way Jesus would — welcoming them, protecting them from those who would mistreat them, introducing them to their heavenly father, and engaging them in ministry.

In 5 minutes:

  • Become a fan of the Stand4Kids Facebook page. Then invite 5 friends to join you.
  • Follow us on Twitter and retweet our posts so that your friends will learn about Stand4Kids issues.
  • Link the Stand4Kids website, www.stand4kids.org on your Facebook wall or blog.

 

In 30 minutes:

  • Encourage others by sharing an example of how you, your family, or your group took a stand for children. Use the My Take a Stand Story form.

 

In 60 minutes:

  • Become a guest blogger for Stand4Kids. Share about a book you’ve read, a great children’s missions resource you’ve used, a children’s ministry idea you’ve tried, or an issue that God has laid on your heart.

 

In 2-3 hours:

  • Host a movie night and watch a film on one aspect of children at risk. Afterwards, discuss the movie and pray for children in the situations portrayed.
  • Host a movie night for children. Watch a film about children in unreached cultures. Play a game and do a craft from the culture you choose. Provide an ethnic snack. Be sure to include a prayer activity. The Kids Around the World series gives you everything you need.
  • Start a book club. Read and discuss books about children-at-risk issues. Pray for children in these situations. In addition, read books about people who have made a difference for children at risk. Be inspired!

 

Get Training:

  • Crisis Care Training International (CCTI), a ministry of WEC International, facilitates training seminars on children-in-crisis. They have developed a modular curriculum used by workers across the globe to minister to children in crisis.
  • The School of Intercultural Studies at Fuller Seminary offers a children at risk specialization.

 

Participate in a Children’s Movement